Home | Legals | Sitemap | KIT

STN Programme
Head: Prof. Dr. Horst Hahn / Prof. Dr. Jan G. Korvink

 

KIT-Campus North
Building 440

H.-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1
76344 Eggenstein-Leop.
Germany

phone: +49(721)608-25578
fax: +49(721)608-25579
e-mail: infoPlb3∂stn kit edu

19th KNMF Call for Proposals

 

Deadline: January 15, 2018

KNMF LogoThe Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF ) is focused on providing users from industry and academia, either national or international, open access to multimaterial state-of-the-art micro- and nanotechnologies.

Submit your proposal and benefit from our expertise!

Links

Welcome

The Helmholtz Research Programme STN (Science and Technology of Nanosystems) takes on the challenge of controlling and shaping materials from the atomic and molecular up to the macroscopic scale to explore their entire potential of novel functionalities.

STN is dedicated towards research and development of

Our activities span the entire range from fundamental science to high performance technologies and integrated systems. We closely cooperate with the Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF) as a large-scale user facility for multimaterial nano and micro technologies.

Willkommen

Im Helmholtz-Programm STN (Science and Technology of Nanosystems) wird das Potential neuartiger Funktionalitäten von Materialien auf der atomaren und molekularen bis zur makroskopischen Ebene erschlossen.

STN betreibt Forschung und Entwicklung in den Themenfeldern

Unsere Arbeiten reichen von der Grundlagenforschung bis zu Hochtechnologien und integrierten Systemen. Wir kooperieren eng mit der Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF) als Großgerät für Nutzer von Nano- und Mikrotechnologien und mit einer großen Vielfalt prozessierbarer Materialien.

Highlights and news archive

 

NEWS

Contrary to classical bits, quantum bits can assume two states at the same time: Right and left, yellow and blue, zero and one. (Photo: KIT)
Quantum Simulator: First Functioning Component

October 4, 2017

Hurricanes, traffic jams, demographic development – to predict the effect of such events, computer simulations are required. Many processes in nature, however, are so complicated that conventional computers fail. Quantum simulators may solve this problem. One of the basic phenomena in nature is the interaction between light and matter in photosynthesis. Physicists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now made a big step towards quantum mechanics understanding of plant metabolism. This is reported in the Nature Communications journal.

Press Release 143/2017
Gold atoms have moved into the dent produced before, refilling it almost completely. (Photo: KIT)
Self-healing Gold Particles

September 14, 2017

Self-healing materials are able to repair autonomously defects, such as scratches, cracks or dents, and resume their original shape. For this purpose, they must be composed of several components whose combined properties result in the desired characteristics. Scientists of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology now discovered that also tiny particles of pure gold have surprising self-healing capacities.

Press Release 111/2017
 
Two Lenz lenses are arranged in a Helmholtz coil pair. Simulation shows how the Lenz lenses focus magnetic flux. (Figure: Nils Spengler/KIT)
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: High Sensitivity on Smallest Space

August 30, 2017

In many areas extending from materials sciences to medicine, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used for detailed molecule-specific investigations. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now succeeded in enhancing the sensitivity of NMR measurements on smallest space. For this purpose, the scientists use so-called Lenz lenses that focus magnetic flux. Among others, medical applications may benefit. The scientists present their method in the journal PLOS ONE. (doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0182779)

Press Release 117/2017
These Solar Glasses with lens-fitted semitransparent organic solar cells supply two sensors and electronics in the temples with electric power. (Photo: KIT)
Solar Glasses Generate Solar Power

July 6, 2017

Organic solar cells are flexible, transparent, and light-weight – and can be manufactured in arbitrary shapes or colors. Thus, they are suitable for a variety of applications that cannot be realized with conventional silicon solar cells. In the Energy Technology journal, researchers from KIT now present sunglasses with colored, semitransparent solar cells applied onto lenses that supply a microprocessor and two displays with electric power. This paves the way for other future applications such as the integration of organic solar cells into windows or overhead glazing.

Press Release 093/2017
 
Soliton frequency combs, generated in silicon nitride microresonators, are used for massively parallel data transmission via various frequency channels (Photo: J. N. Kemal/ P. Marin-Palomo/ KIT)
Nature: Optical Communication at Record-High Speed

June 8, 2017

Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have set a new record for optical data transmission: As reported in Nature, the team exploits optical solitons circulating in silicon nitride microresonators to generate broadband optical frequency combs. Two such superimposed frequency combs enable massive parallel data transmission on 179 wavelength channels at a data rate of more than 50 terabits per second. (DOI: 10.1038/nature22387).

Press Release 074/2017
Australian Laureate Fellow 2017: Professor Christopher Barner-Kowollik (Photo: Irina Westermann)
Light-Driven Customization of High-Tech Materials

June 7, 2017

Touching up scratches in car paint with laser technology, using light to make sensitive electronic parts more flexible or harder: These are the solutions Professor Christopher Barner-Kowollik is working on at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia. His research on novel ways to precisely adapt coatings and materials for different applications using spectrally pure light from lasers, is now also the focus of a project funded by the Australian Research Council with more than AUD three million (more than EUR two million).

Press Release 073/2017
 
3-dimensional microstructures can be written using a laser, erased, and rewritten. (Photo: KIT)
Erasable Ink for 3D Printing

April 24, 2017

3D printing by direct laser writing produces micrometer-sized structures with precisely defined properties. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to erase the ink used for 3D printing. In this way, the small structures of up to 100 nm in size can be erased and rewritten repeatedly. One nanometer corresponds to one millionth of a millimeter. This development opens up many new applications of 3D fabrication in biology or materials sciences, for instance.

Press Release 050/2017
Stripes of nanostructures in perovskite solar cells can be detected by means of a type of scanning force microscopy (shown schematically). (Figure: Holger Röhm, Tobias Leonhard/KIT)
Solar Cells with Nanostripes

April 12, 2017

Solar cells based on perovskites reach high efficiencies: They convert more than 20 percent of the incident light directly into usable power. On their search for underlying physical mechanisms, researchers of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now detected strips of nanostructures with alternating directions of polarization in the perovskite layers. These structures might serve as transport paths for charge carriers. This is reported in the Energy & Environmental Science Journal. (DOI: 10.1039/c7ee00420f)

Press Release 048/2017
 
Wolfgang Wernsdorfer is Humboldt Professor at KIT. (Photo: Sandra Göttisheim, KIT)
Optics Advance Quantum Information Processing

April 7, 2017

Experimental physicist Professor Wolfgang Wernsdorfer of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) was selected by the European Research Council for funding with an ERC Advanced Grant for his project “Molecular Quantum Opto-Spintronics” (MoQuOS). MoQuOS covers optical manipulation and characterization of molecular quantum bits. Within the framework of MoQuOS, Wernsdorfer, who has been holding an Alexander von Humboldt professorship since 2016, plans to develop together with his team rapid and reliable methods to read out spin states of individual magnetic molecules for quantum information processing.

Press Release 047/2017
The molecular contact can be switched on and off mechanically and electrostatically. (Photo: KIT)
Reliable Molecular Toggle Switch Developed

March 9, 2017

Nanotechnology constantly allows for new records in miniaturization. Reduction of the dimension of electronic components, however, has physical limits that will be reached soon. Novel materials and components are required. This is where molecular electronics comes in. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now succeeded in developing a molecular toggle switch that does not only remain in the position selected, but can also be flipped as often as desired. This is reported in Nature Communications. 

Press Release 031/2017
 
The metal-organic framework is set up like a sandwich (a). The molecular textile layer is woven in an active layer that is embedded between so-called sacrificial layers (b). (Image: KIT)
Metal-organic Frameworks Used as Looms

February 15, 2017

Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have made major progress in the production of two-dimensional polymer-based materials. To produce cloths from monomolecular threads, the scientists used SURMOFs, i.e. surface-mounted metal-organic frameworks, developed by KIT. They inserted four-armed monomers, i.e. smaller molecular building blocks, into some SURMOF layers. Cross-linking of the monomers then resulted in textiles consisting of interwoven polymer threads. This work is now presented in Nature Communications. (DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14442)

Press Release 020/2017
Microscopic components made of silicon (blue) and special polymers (green) convert electrical into optical signals and vice versa. (Graphics: KIT)
Turning Research into Innovations

February 1, 2017

The European Research Council (ERC) has decided to fund two innovative ideas of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). For their first steps from fundamental research to commerciali-zation, these projects are now granted about EUR 150,000 each. The so-called “Proof of Concept Grants” serve to further de-velop application-relevant research findings for the market. The KIT projects funded by the ERC cover the analysis of biological samples and data transmission by light.

Press Release 013/2017
 
A cancer cell under the microscope: The STED image (left) has a background of low resolution. In the STEDD image (right), background suppression results in much better visible structures. (Image: APH/KIT)
Background Suppression for Super-resolution Light Microscopy

January 31, 2017

Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a new fluorescence microscopy method: STEDD (Stimulation Emission Double Depletion) nanoscopy produces images of highest resolution with suppressed background. The new method yields an enhanced image quality, which is advantageous when analyzing three-dimensional, densely arranged subcellular structures. STEDD, a further development of the STED method, is now presented in Nature Photonics. (DOI: 10.1038/NPHOTON.2016.279)

Press Release 012/2017
The ring structure of the metamaterial was inspired by mail armor of medieval knights. (Photo: KIT)
Metamaterial: Mail Armor Inspires Physicists

January 19, 2017

The Middle Ages certainly were far from being science-friendly: Whoever looked for new findings off the beaten track faced the threat of being burned at the stake. Hence, the contribution of this era to technical progress is deemed to be rather small. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), however, were inspired by medieval mail armor when producing a new metamaterial with novel properties. They succeeded in reversing the Hall coefficient of a material.

Press Release 006/2017