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STN Programme
Head: Prof. Dr. Horst Hahn / Prof. Dr. Jan G. Korvink

 

KIT-Campus North
Building 440

H.-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1
76344 Eggenstein-Leop.
Germany

phone: +49(721)608-25578
fax: +49(721)608-25579
e-mail: infoWgv2βˆ‚stn kit edu

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Welcome

The Helmholtz Research Programme STN (Science and Technology of Nanosystems) takes on the challenge of controlling and shaping materials from the atomic and molecular up to the macroscopic scale to explore their entire potential of novel functionalities.

STN is dedicated towards research and development of

Our activities span the entire range from fundamental science to high performance technologies and integrated systems. We closely cooperate with the Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF) as a large-scale user facility for multimaterial nano and micro technologies.

Willkommen

Im Helmholtz-Programm STN (Science and Technology of Nanosystems) wird das Potential neuartiger Funktionalitäten von Materialien auf der atomaren und molekularen bis zur makroskopischen Ebene erschlossen.

STN betreibt Forschung und Entwicklung in den Themenfeldern

Unsere Arbeiten reichen von der Grundlagenforschung bis zu Hochtechnologien und integrierten Systemen. Wir kooperieren eng mit der Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF) als Großgerät für Nutzer von Nano- und Mikrotechnologien und mit einer großen Vielfalt prozessierbarer Materialien.

Highlights and news archive

 

Team 2017 (Picture: KIT)

 

NEWS

Transparent, electrically conductive, and selective to one type of charge carriers: these are the properties of hole transport layers for Perovskite solar cells. (Photo: Tobias Abzieher, KIT)
Highly Efficient Solar Cells Thanks to Solid Foundation

July 17, 2019

The sun is an inexhaustible and sustainable source of energy. Hence, photovoltaics is gaining importance in German energy production. Among promising materials for solar cells – with a high efficiency and low production costs – are metal-organic Perovskites. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a novel type of highly efficient nickel oxide hole transport layer that can be deposited on large areas and reaches record efficiencies in these solar cells.

Press Release 097/2019
Seamless integration of wireless transmission lines into glass-fiber networks results in high-performance data networks. A detailed description of the figure is given at the end of the text. (Graphics: IPQ/KIT)
Technologies for the Sixth Generation Cellular Network

July 16, 2019

Future wireless data networks will have to reach higher transmission rates and shorter delays, while supplying an increasing number of end devices. For this purpose, network structures consisting of many small radio cells will be required. To connect these cells, high-performance transmission lines at high frequencies up to the terahertz range will be needed. Moreover, seamless connection to glass fiber networks must be ensured, if possible. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) use ultra-rapid electro-optical modulators to convert terahertz data signals into optical signals. This is reported in Nature Photonics (DOI: 10.1038/s41566-019-0475-6).

Press Release 095/2019
 
Carbon dioxide (red-black) and hydrogen (gray) catalytically react to graphene (black) on copper-palladium surfaces. (Picture: E. Moreno-Pineda, KIT)
Producing Graphene from Carbon Dioxide

July 08, 2019

The general public knows the chemical compound of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and because of its global-warming effect. However, carbon dioxide can also be a useful raw material for chemical reactions. A working group at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has now reported on this unusual application in the ChemSusChem journal. They are using carbon dioxide as a raw material to produce graphene, a technological material which is currently the subject of intense study. (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201901404)

Press Release 090/2019
The fluxonium qubit containing granular Aluminum can remain in a state between "0" and "1" for a time of up to 30 microseconds (Fig. Ioan Pop, KIT)
Granular Aluminum for Future Computers

May 02, 2019

Computers based on quantum mechanical principles can solve certain tasks particularly efficiently. Their information carriers, the so-called qubits, not only have the values "0" and "1", but also states in between, called superposition states. However, maintaining such a state is difficult. Scientists at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now used granular aluminum (nicknamed grAl) for qubits and have shown that this superconducting material has great potential to overcome the previous limits of quantum hardware. The researchers report in the journal Nature Materials (DOI: 10.1038 / s41563-019-0350-3).

Press Release 060/2019