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STN Programme
Head: Prof. Dr. Horst Hahn / Prof. Dr. Jan G. Korvink

 

KIT-Campus North
Building 440

H.-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1
76344 Eggenstein-Leop.
Germany

phone: +49(721)608-25578
fax: +49(721)608-25579
e-mail: infoDvb7∂stn kit edu

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Welcome to STN (Science and Technology of Nanosystems)

The Helmholtz Research Programme STN takes on the challenge of controlling and shaping materials from the atomic and molecular up to the macroscopic scale to explore their entire potential of novel functionalities.

STN is dedicated towards research and development of

Our activities span the entire range from fundamental science to high performance technologies and integrated systems. We closely cooperate with the Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF) as a large-scale user facility for multimaterial nano and micro technologies.

Willkommen bei STN (Science and Technology of Nanosystems)

Im Helmholtz-Programm STN wird das Potential neuartiger Funktionalitäten von Materialien auf der atomaren und molekularen bis zur makroskopischen Ebene erschlossen.

STN betreibt Forschung und Entwicklung in den Themenfeldern

Unsere Arbeiten reichen von der Grundlagenforschung bis zu Hochtechnologien und integrierten Systemen. Wir kooperieren eng mit der Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF) als Großgerät für Nutzer von Nano- und Mikrotechnologien und mit einer großen Vielfalt prozessierbarer Materialien.

 

NEWS

Wolfgang Wernsdorfer. (Photo: Humboldt-Stiftung/Wolfgang Hemmann)
KIT Brings Outstanding Experimental Physicist Back to Germany

May 4, 2016

Germany’s award in the highest amount for researchers from abroad was handed over to Professor Wolfgang Wernsdorfer yesterday evening (May 03) in Berlin. The pioneer of molecular spin electronics will now return from France to Germany: From June 01, 2016, Wernsdorfer will continue his research for the development of future quantum computers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The research award in the amount of EUR 5 million was handed over by the State Secretary of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Cornelia Quennet-Thielen, and the President of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Professor Helmut Schwarz.

Press Release 070/2016
Carbon nanotube above a photonic crystal waveguide with electrodes. The structure converts electric signals into light. (Photo: WWU)
Nature Photonics: Light Source for Quicker Computer Chips

April 19, 2016

Worldwide growing data volumes make conventional electronic processing reach its limits. Future information technology is therefore expected to use light as a medium for quick data transmission also within computer chips. Researchers under the direction of KIT have now demonstrated that carbon nanotubes are suited for use as on-chip light source for tomorrow’s information technology, when nanostructured waveguides are applied to obtain the desired light properties. The scientists now present their results in Nature Photonics. DOI: 10.1038/NPHOTON. 2016.70

Press Release 059/2016
 
Organic laser on a silicon photonic chip: Optical excitation from above generates laser light in the waveguide. (Graphics: KIT)
Nature Communications: Laser Source for Biosensors

March 7, 2016

In the area of nano photonics, scientists for the first time succeeded in integrating a laser with an organic gain medium on a silicon photonic chip. This approach is of enormous potential for low-cost biosensors that might be used for near-patient diagnosis once and without any sterilization expenditure similar to today’s strips for measuring blood sugar. The researchers now present the new laser in Nature Communications: DOI: 10.1038/ncomms10864

Press Release 034/2016
The smallest lattice in the world is visible under the microscope only. Struts and braces are 0.2 µm in diameter. Total size of the lattice is about 10 µm. (Photo: J. Bauer / KIT)
Nature Materials: Smallest Lattice Structure Worldwide

February 2, 2016

KIT scientists now present the smallest lattice structure made by man in the Nature Materials journal. Its struts and braces are made of glassy carbon and are less than 1 µm long and 200 nm in diameter. They are smaller than comparable metamaterials by a factor of 5. The small dimension results in so far unreached ratios of strength to density. Applications as electrodes, filters or optical components might be possible. (DOI: 10.1038/nmat4561)

Press Release 015/2016
 
Channels or other flow structures inside of compact microreactors optimize mixing of chemicals and heat removal during processes. (Photo: IMVT/KIT)
Chemistry: Efficient Processes in Smallest Systems

January 26, 2016

The German Research Foundation (DFG) funds a new research group at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the University of Freiburg: “Acquisition and control of dynamic local process states in microreactors by latest in-situ sensors”, briefly called ProMiSe. Scientists are to develop electronic and optical microsensors and measurement technologies to better understand chemical and physical processes in microstructured process technology systems, to reduce the costs of these processes, and to make them more energy-efficient.

Press Release 012/2016
Step by step towards the complete shell: Formation of a metal cluster from the atomic constituents to the compound. (Photo: Dehnen Group, Philipps-Universität Marburg)
Nature Communications: How Metal Clusters Grow

January 25, 2016

First the nucleus, then the shell: Researchers from Marburg and Karlsruhe have studied stepwise formation of metal clusters, smallest fractions of metals in molecular form. The shell gradually forms around the inner atom rather than by later inclusion of the central atom. Knowledge of all development steps may allow for customized optoelectronic and magnetic properties, as is reported by the researchers in the science journal “Nature Communications”. (DOI: 10.1038/NCOMMS10480)

Press Release 010/2016