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STN Programme
Head: Prof. Dr. Horst Hahn / Prof. Dr. Jan G. Korvink

 

KIT-Campus North
Building 440

H.-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1
76344 Eggenstein-Leop.
Germany

phone: +49(721)608-25578
fax: +49(721)608-25579
e-mail: infoCrn1∂stn kit edu

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Welcome

The Helmholtz Research Programme STN (Science and Technology of Nanosystems) takes on the challenge of controlling and shaping materials from the atomic and molecular up to the macroscopic scale to explore their entire potential of novel functionalities.

STN is dedicated towards research and development of

Our activities span the entire range from fundamental science to high performance technologies and integrated systems. We closely cooperate with the Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF) as a large-scale user facility for multimaterial nano and micro technologies.

Willkommen

Im Helmholtz-Programm STN (Science and Technology of Nanosystems) wird das Potential neuartiger Funktionalitäten von Materialien auf der atomaren und molekularen bis zur makroskopischen Ebene erschlossen.

STN betreibt Forschung und Entwicklung in den Themenfeldern

Unsere Arbeiten reichen von der Grundlagenforschung bis zu Hochtechnologien und integrierten Systemen. Wir kooperieren eng mit der Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF) als Großgerät für Nutzer von Nano- und Mikrotechnologien und mit einer großen Vielfalt prozessierbarer Materialien.

Highlights and news archive

 

Team 2017 (Picture: KIT)

 

NEWS

Three-dimensional microstructures made of various cleavable photoresists. The scanning electron microscopies show the selective degradation of the structures (scaling 20 µm). (Photo: Nature Communications)
3D Inks that Can Be Erased Selectively

August 01, 2018

3D printing by direct laser writing enables production of micro-meter-sized structures for many applications, from biomedicine to microelectronics to optical metamaterials. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed 3D inks that can be erased selectively. This allows specific degradation and reassembly of highly precise structures on the micrometer and nanometer scales. The new photoresists are presented in the journal Nature Communications (DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-05234-0).

Press Release 094/2018
The highly water-repellent surface of floating fern (salvinia) serves as a model of the AIRCOAT technology. (Photo: Schimmel Team, KIT)
Air Coating Makes Ships Glide through the Water more Easily

May 02, 2018

Under the AIRCOAT project, researchers from all over Europe develop an air coating that reduces frictional resistance of ships. They use the salvinia effect studied by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). It allows an air layer to permanently exist under water. The European Commission funds AIRCOAT with a total of EUR 5.3 million. Of these funds, KIT receives about 1 million euros. The project is coordinated scientifically by physicist and nanotechnology expert Professor Thomas Schimmel, KIT.

Press Release 053/2018